Lime & Coconut Cream Pie (with a chocolate base!)

Lime & Coconut Cream Pie

Well this one surely has to make it into the Two Kitchens hall of fame! It’s made from avocados so it is so great for increasing your essential fatty acid intake. Avocados just have such a huge range of health benefits so the more we can get them into our diet the better. I’ve also used cacao for more plant-based protein and all of the other ingredients are organic wholefoods free of gluten, wheat, dairy, grains, sugar and egg. This is a totally vegan and paleo recipe and so super creamy and indulgent!

Ingredients

Base:
125g pecans, soaked for at least 4 hours then drained
30 pitted medjool dates
1 heaped tbsp raw cacao powder
2 tbsp coconut oil, melted
1 tbsp organic maple syrup

Filling:
The flesh from 5 avocados, ripe but not brown in any places
Juice of 4 limes
3 tbsp coconut oil, melted
3/4 cup maple syrup
4 tbsp coconut cream

Toppings:
Zest from 2 of your limes
Desiccated Coconut

Method

Once you’ve soaked your pecans, simply put them in the blender until they are a meal, then add the rest of the base ingredients and blend until smooth.

Cut a piece of baking paper the same size as the bottom of a round springform cake tin and place the baking paper at the bottom then grease all over with coconut oil. Put your base mixture into it and smooth it down with a spatula until it is compact. Place it in the freezer for 20-30 mins.

Next, add all the filling ingredients to the clean blender and blend until it looks like a smooth mousse.

Once the base is ready to come out of the freezer, smooth the filling on top and put in the freezer for an hour and a half. It needs to be firm but not frozen. Take it out and sprinkle desiccated coconut and lime zest on the top then keep it in the fridge straight away (after serving or before).

Enjoy!

Love,
Lauren

Pretty in Pink Valentine’s Juice

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I felt like something pink and sweet on this Valentine’s morning so I made this beautiful juice!

Originally from Persia, the pomegranate has been revered as a symbol of health, fertility and eternal life for thousands of years. I’m always amazed at how nature gives us clues as to which fruit or vegetable is good for a certain part of our bodies. There is something heart-like about a pomegranate when you open it, with its blood-red seeds and white membranes. Pomegranate contains a unique compound called punicalagin, which is excellent for heart health. It lowers cholesterol and blood pressure, and increases the rate at which arterial blockages melt away. The antioxidants in pomegranate also help to prevent stroke and heart attack.

Radishes eliminate toxins, aid digestion and prevent viral infections.

Ingredients (serves 2)

1 pomegranate, skin and membranes discarded (you don’t have to spend half an hour picking out every little piece of membrane – just the majority of it!)
3 radishes
1 lime (you can juice the skin)
1 medium cucumber
a few sprigs of mint
1 red pepper

Method

Put everything through your juicer. Add ice if you like.

Health & happiness!

Love,
Raine

Raine’s Favourite Green Juice

green juice
Drinking green juice on an empty stomach when you wake up gives you a boost of nutrients that will give you energy for the day, heal your cells and fight off free-radicals (the nasty stuff that causes cancer.) I drink one just about every morning, and on the days that I don’t have a juice I can really feel the difference.
If you’ve never had a green or any vegetable juice before it may take you some time to get used to it, but I promise it will be worth it. If my husband can get used to it (and now even love it) then anyone can! On a hot summer morning it’s super refreshing, and in the winter months it gives your body everything it needs to fight off colds and flu.

The general rule is that you should juice your veg but eat your fruit (as is or blended in a smoothie.) This is because fruit is high in natural sugars so you need the fibre in the fruit to prevent a blood-sugar spike.
However, if you’re new to juicing, I recommend that you start off with a little bit less of the really strong tasting stuff (spinach, kale, broccoli etc) and use more of the easy-drinking vegetables (carrot, beetroot, celery, cucumber) along with fruit (apple, pineapple, grapes etc.) As you get used to it you can increase the vegetables and decrease the fruit. After all, what’s the point of making one really strong juice and then never having another?!
Over time you’ll start to enjoy the taste of the vegetables and will only need half an apple, or eventually none at all.

I make juice with whatever fresh vegetables, fruit, herbs and spices (fresh ginger or turmeric, sometimes even chilli!) I have available. I like to mix it up. This is one of my favourite combinations – I love the liquorice flavour of the fennel and it goes really well with the lime and lemongrass.

Ingredients (serves 2)

A big handful of kale or spinach
6 baby fennel or 1 large bulb
3/4 of a large English cucumber
2 limes
a knob of ginger (not too much if you’re not used to it)
a knob of turmeric (optional – great anti-inflammatory properties)
a stick of lemongrass
a handful of white grapes, or 1 – 2 apples
a few leaves of mint

Method

I highly recommend a slow, masticating juicer over a centrifugal juicer, as it preserves nutrients and gets maximum juice out of your ingredients, especially when it comes to leafy greens. (But juice from a centrifugal juicer is better than no juice at all!)
The money you spend on a quality slow juicer, such as an Oscar or Hurom, will be well worth it and will save you in doctor’s bills in the future.

When juicing in a slow juicer, always do your leafy greens first and don’t try to shove too much in at once – give the machine a chance to do its thing.

You can also check out Lauren’s Favourite Green Juice.

Health and happiness!

Love,
Raine