Masala Chai Turmeric Latte

masala-chai-turmeric-latte

 

I have been drinking turmeric lattes for a while now, ever since the arthritis flare up I had last year (as turmeric is such an awesome anti-inflammatory) and I love masala chai also, so when I got given a masala chai spice kit from RawSpiceBar, I thought I’d combine the two, and it was just delicious.

When Braxton goes down for his afternoon nap it’s always that time of day where I am desperate for something warm and sweet and just for me, and this really is a perfect hot drink to enjoy during the short amount of time I get to myself each day.

Give it a go, it’s so warming and healthy and also so good for you!

Ingredients

Mug full of almond milk
1 tsp turmeric
Quarter sachet of masala chai spice mix from RawSpiceBar or other masala chai spice mix
1 tsp maple syrup

Method

Warm the milk in a saucepan and add the spices. Once warm add the maple.

Drink and enjoy!

Love & health,
Lauren

Summer Squash, Sweet Potato & Turmeric Baby Blend

Sweet potato summer squash turmeric

And another use for those summer squashes my mum brought back from Suffolk! This time in batch cooking for Braxton. He’s old enough to be eating proper solid food now but I still make the odd bit of mush to mix in with it as he likes it, and also it’s a great way to get things like turmeric into him for anti-inflammatory goodness.

Ingredients
2 summer squashes
2 sweet potatoes
1 tsp (if powder) or 4 tbsp (if liquid) homemade or organic, low salt vegetable stock
1 tsp turmeric

Method

Steam the vegetables for about 10 minutes or until soft then put them in the blender with the stock and turmeric and blend until you reach desired consistency.

Love & health,
Lauren & Braxton

Turmeric Latte

Turmeric Latte

When I was going through my postpartum arthritis flare I had one of these every day. For inflammatory diseases, we’d be silly not to. Turmeric has a hugely high anti-inflammatory content so it’s amazing for inflammation but also great for daily health. In India people drink turmeric drinks every day. My friend Shivani was actually the one who told me to do this a few years ago. She started giving this drink to her son as soon as he turned 1!

It sounds like it’s going to be a bit gruesome but it’s actually really yummy and fulfilling.

Ingredients

Half a mug almond milk
Half a tsp organic, high-grade turmeric
tsp agave, maple or honey
Quarter tsp cinnamon and 1 cinnamon stick if you want

Method

Heat the almond milk in a saucepan.

When it starts bubbling gently add the sweetener and turmeric and mix well. Let it heat a bit more before transferring it to a mug and then sprinkle the cinnamon and add the cinnamon stick if using.

Love & health,
Lauren

Cauliflower, Sweet Potato & Turmeric

Cauliflower, sweet pot, potato, stock, turmeric

Are you wondering why I picture all my baby food recipes in plastic bowls? I’m a mum! I don’t have time to style them in nice china dishes then spoon them all back into the plastic bowls that are safe for him to eat from! This category is all about being real; real mums in real kitchens with only 24 hours in one day, and most real mums I know feed their babies from plastic bowls!

All the plastic I use for Braxton is BPA free and this is very important. BPA is the resin in some plastics used to package food or drinks and it can seep into food, causing us to ingest these chemicals. In the long-term this can cause behaviour problems, brain development issues and can even feed through to unborn babies if the mother has too much exposure. Look for BPA free products where you can with bowls, plates, cutlery, bottles and cups for your bubbas.

Moving on to the food… Braxton LOVED this one! It’s so creamy that it almost tastes cheesy (and I don’t give him dairy so this is a bonus!) and it’s really filling, and super easy to make. The turmeric is a great anti-inflammatory (great for eczema) and this is a great way to get these sorts of spices into your babies from early on. Firstly so they get used to the taste and accept it, but also to add the nutrients from so early on.

Ingredients (makes 1 batch of about 10 small meals)

1 cauliflower head, cut into florets
1 large sweet potato, peeled and chopped
1 normal potato, peeled and chopped
1 onion, peeled and chopped
1 tsp turmeric
1 cube homemade bone broth or vegetable stock or a Kallo low salt veg stock cube

Method

Steam all the vegetables together in a steamer (this retains more of the nutrients than boiling the veg) until soft.

If your stock cube is homemade and frozen, melt it in a saucepan over a low heat. If you are using a store-bought stock cube, mix it in a quarter cup boiling water.

Put the steamed food in the blender or food processor and add the turmeric and stock and blend until smooth or leave some lumps if you like, then spoon into individual containers or ice cube trays – I like the Nuk ones by Annabel Karmel

I hope your baby loves it as much as mine does!

Love,
Lauren & Braxton

 

Turmeric Hummus

Turmeric Hummus

The search for healthy snacks is never ending in my house. I don’t like big meals so I tend to eat little and often so there is nothing better for me than some homemade hummus with some carrot or celery sticks or some gluten-free crackers. Check out my roasted red pepper hummus – that one was to die for (and the picture is way better than this one!) I didn’t have too much time today, I just needed to blitz it in the blender and go. I wanted to use turmeric as it is such an amazing anti-inflammatory and I try to use it in as much food as I can.

Ingredients

2 tins organic chickpeas (drained and rinsed)
Quarter cup purified water
2 tbsp tahini paste
5 tbsp lemon juice
2 tbsp olive oil
Half tsp Himalayan salt
Half tsp garlic salt
1 tbsp turmeric

Method

Simply blend all ingredients together in a high speed blender until completely smooth – it really is as easy as that! Enjoy with gluten free bread, crackers, rice or quinoa cakes or veggies.

Enjoy!

Love,
Lauren

 

 

Butternut Squash & Ginger Soup

Butternut Ginger Soup

Another warming soup for another cold London day. You can probably tell by all my recipes how much I love butternut squash! Butternut squash have a lower glycemic index than potatoes and are high in fibre so great for the metabolism. They’re packed with Vitamin A and potassium, are low in calories (low GI) and high in Vitamin B Complex which I need lots of for my nerve problems caused by long-term arthritis. They are also high in polyphenols (like acai berries and blueberries) which are great anti-oxidants. An all round brilliant vegetable! I added ginger, firstly because I like to take advantage of the detox affects of ginger but also because it gives it a great kick. The two flavours really go nicely together – my mum taught me that! I of course added turmeric, as I do to everything that is yellow, for some anti-inflammatory action.

Ingredients

1 butternut squash
1 large sweet potato
1 onion
1 cup vegetable stock
1 cup almond or coconut milk
1 tsp freshly shaved ginger
1 tsp turmeric
Salt & pepper to taste
Half tsp coconut oil
Handful of pine nuts (optional)

Method

Peel and chop your vegetables. When that’s done, heat the oil in a large saucepan and when hot, add the onion and cook for one minute. Then add the butternut and sweet potato and coat in the oil, 30 seconds should be enough.

Add the stock and almond milk, along with the rest of the ingredients and keep at a high temperature until it starts bubbling then turn down to low, put on the lid and let it simmer for an hour.

Once all veggies are soft, use a handheld blender to blend (or put it in a food processor if you don’t have a handheld) and blend until smooth. Add salt & pepper to taste. Decorate with pine nuts, a great accompaniment for this soup!

Enjoy!
Love,
Lauren

Raine’s Favourite Green Juice

green juice
Drinking green juice on an empty stomach when you wake up gives you a boost of nutrients that will give you energy for the day, heal your cells and fight off free-radicals (the nasty stuff that causes cancer.) I drink one just about every morning, and on the days that I don’t have a juice I can really feel the difference.
If you’ve never had a green or any vegetable juice before it may take you some time to get used to it, but I promise it will be worth it. If my husband can get used to it (and now even love it) then anyone can! On a hot summer morning it’s super refreshing, and in the winter months it gives your body everything it needs to fight off colds and flu.

The general rule is that you should juice your veg but eat your fruit (as is or blended in a smoothie.) This is because fruit is high in natural sugars so you need the fibre in the fruit to prevent a blood-sugar spike.
However, if you’re new to juicing, I recommend that you start off with a little bit less of the really strong tasting stuff (spinach, kale, broccoli etc) and use more of the easy-drinking vegetables (carrot, beetroot, celery, cucumber) along with fruit (apple, pineapple, grapes etc.) As you get used to it you can increase the vegetables and decrease the fruit. After all, what’s the point of making one really strong juice and then never having another?!
Over time you’ll start to enjoy the taste of the vegetables and will only need half an apple, or eventually none at all.

I make juice with whatever fresh vegetables, fruit, herbs and spices (fresh ginger or turmeric, sometimes even chilli!) I have available. I like to mix it up. This is one of my favourite combinations – I love the liquorice flavour of the fennel and it goes really well with the lime and lemongrass.

Ingredients (serves 2)

A big handful of kale or spinach
6 baby fennel or 1 large bulb
3/4 of a large English cucumber
2 limes
a knob of ginger (not too much if you’re not used to it)
a knob of turmeric (optional – great anti-inflammatory properties)
a stick of lemongrass
a handful of white grapes, or 1 – 2 apples
a few leaves of mint

Method

I highly recommend a slow, masticating juicer over a centrifugal juicer, as it preserves nutrients and gets maximum juice out of your ingredients, especially when it comes to leafy greens. (But juice from a centrifugal juicer is better than no juice at all!)
The money you spend on a quality slow juicer, such as an Oscar or Hurom, will be well worth it and will save you in doctor’s bills in the future.

When juicing in a slow juicer, always do your leafy greens first and don’t try to shove too much in at once – give the machine a chance to do its thing.

You can also check out Lauren’s Favourite Green Juice.

Health and happiness!

Love,
Raine